Seabirds

Wings over waves

Print edition : April 28, 2017

Red-billed tropicbird roosting.

A flock of terns in Bangaram, a famous tourist destination in Lakshadweep.

A view of Agati island and the runway.

The adult red-billed tropicbird can be identified by a combination of white central tail feathers and a red or orange-red bill. A.O. Hume, the father of India ornithology, observed that "their flight is very like that of terns, though stronger and more steady; they work backwards and forwards fishing with their long sharp bills pointed straight downwards".

The adult red-billed tropicbird can be identified by a combination of white central tail feathers and a red or orange-red bill. A.O. Hume, the father of India ornithology, observed that "their flight is very like that of terns, though stronger and more steady; they work backwards and forwards fishing with their long sharp bills pointed straight downwards".

The adult red-billed tropicbird can be identified by a combination of white central tail feathers and a red or orange-red bill. A.O. Hume, the father of India ornithology, observed that "their flight is very like that of terns, though stronger and more steady; they work backwards and forwards fishing with their long sharp bills pointed straight downwards".

The adult red-billed tropicbird can be identified by a combination of white central tail feathers and a red or orange-red bill. A.O. Hume, the father of India ornithology, observed that "their flight is very like that of terns, though stronger and more steady; they work backwards and forwards fishing with their long sharp bills pointed straight downwards".

The adult red-billed tropicbird can be identified by a combination of white central tail feathers and a red or orange-red bill. A.O. Hume, the father of India ornithology, observed that "their flight is very like that of terns, though stronger and more steady; they work backwards and forwards fishing with their long sharp bills pointed straight downwards".

The adult red-billed tropicbird can be identified by a combination of white central tail feathers and a red or orange-red bill. A.O. Hume, the father of India ornithology, observed that "their flight is very like that of terns, though stronger and more steady; they work backwards and forwards fishing with their long sharp bills pointed straight downwards".

The graceful tropicbird in Perumal Par.

The tiny Perumal Par island, which is the breeding ground of many seabird species.

Pacific golden plover (Pluvialis fulva).

Common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos).

The bar-tailed godwit (Limosa lapponica).

The brown noddy (Anous stolidus).

The common greenshank (Tringa nebularia).

The lesser crested tern (Sterna bengalensis).

Saunders tern (Sternula saundersi) in Bangaram.

The grey plover (Pluvialis squatorola).

The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres interpres).

Flying fish. Its flight provides an amazing spectacle. The seabirds feed almost entirely on flying fishes and squids.

Butterfly fish. The tropical marine fish is found mostly in ocean reefs.

Sooty tern (Sterna fuscata). A study found that the sooty tern and several other birds were threatened because of oceanic and environmental fluctuations.

The whimbrel (numenius phaeopus).

The local people performing a folk dance in the lagoon beach.

Bangaram is considered the jewel of Lakshadweep.

Fishermen setting sail from the shores of Bangaram.

K.I. Bijoy, wildlife photographer.

    This article is closed for comments.
    Please Email the Editor