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THROUGH MY WINDOW
K. Satchidanandan is a Malayalam poet, translator, academic and bilingual critic and former Secretary, Sahitya Akademi.
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The politics of rereading

Rereadings of canonical texts side by side with the discovery of buried and forgotten texts have certainly unleashed a lot of radical energy in the realm of criticism. »

Dilemmas of Indian literary criticism

The history of Indian criticism in the past few decades has been the history of the varied responses to various challenges and the attempts to arrive at some critical canon that might help unlock and explain contemporary Indian texts. »

Inside, outside

On two autobiographies that deal with discontent and change but in radically different circumstances: set in two entirely different continents of experience, written in two different languages and following two different modes of narration. »

No end to hope

Even when poetry is dark and angst-ridden, it remains the scream of the agonised mind full of concern for the future or for humankind. Poetry speaks for the victims of all kinds of oppression. »

Bombay meri jaan

Bombay’s fascination comes from many sources: its deep history, its colonial past, the impact of Partition, and its cosmopolitan population. »

Translating India

With India’s plurilingual heritage, translation, with its accretions, adaptations and substitutions, was often a reinterpretation of the “original”. It continues to be a way of having a living dialogue with our past and between our different cultures. »

Reality, from the margins

“Vanity Bagh” by Anees Salim and “Foreign” by Sonora Jha are representative of works of many new writers who do not mind taking the risks involved in portraying Indian rural reality in English. »

Shattering of gestalt

Modernism in Indian literature, in retrospect, appears to have been a way of documenting the dehumanisation of society after Independence with its attendant alienation, morbidity and loss of identity. »

‘Paraja’ reborn

Hrusikesh Panda’s “The People of Sunaput” explores how tribal people are exploited in the name of development, a theme portrayed poignantly in the pre-Independence novel “Paraja”. But Sunaput’s tribal people are conscious of their rights and are ready to fight the system. »

Geographies of imagination

Almost Island, a writers’ collective with a rich online literary background, has made a mark on the Indian publishing scene with three remarkable books. »
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