Frontline
Volume 24 - Issue 19 :: Sep. 22-Oct. 05, 2007
INDIA'S NATIONAL MAGAZINE
from the publishers of THE HINDU
Contents

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LETTERS

P. Jeevanandham

IT was good to read about P. Jeevanandham in Frontline, but one vital aspect of his contribution remained unmentioned ("Cultural warrior", August 24). Periyar encouraged P. Jeevanandham to translate Bhagat Singh's classic essay "Why I am an atheist" way back in 1933. Jeevanandham translated it into Tamil, which was probably its first ever translation, predating translations even in Hindi or Punjabi. The translation was published in Tamil by Periyar's publication. It was so popular that there were 25 editions or reprints until 2005. In his paper Kudi Arasu dated March 29, 1931, Periyar himself paid glowing tributes to Bhagat Singh after his execution. Periyar's Tamil piece on Bhagat Singh was translated into English in 2006. It is now included in Jail Notebook and Other Writings of Bhagat Singh, published by Leftword this year.

Chaman Lal
Editor
Complete documents of Bhagat Singh (IN HINDI)
New Delhi

Naxal terror

The government, besides combating naxalism, should ensure the uplift of tribal people (Cover Story, September 21). When a section of society is marginalised and downtrodden, it is easy for terrorism to take root. If tribal India had proper schools, roads, electricity, sanitation and educational facilities, naxalism would not be able to flourish there.

Marisha Fonseca
Mumbai

THE Maoists have changed their modus operandi in the past few years. Not only have they gained access to sophisticated weapons and technology but have also established new kinds of networks. The police should re-orient their strategy to combat Maoist violence. They must rectify their negative image, which is reinforced by incidents such as the Vakapalli rape case. Police forces involved in anti-Maoist campaigns should be sensitised about human rights..

Naveen Marrapu
Hyderabad

IT is tragic that naxalism, which started as a movement to restore dignity to underprivileged sections of society, has turned into the biggest threat for internal security. Dilly-dallying on the part of the Central government has allowed naxalites to spread their roots. They also appear to be hand-in-glove with anti-national elements in regions close to the Nepal border. Shivraj Patil seems to be looking for labyrinthine political solutions instead of taking strong measures to curb their growth.

Arvind K. Pandey
Allahabad

IT is a shame that some of our own countrymen have to resort to civil war tactics to fight inequality and oppression. The Constitution guarantees equality to all, irrespective of caste, creed, language and religion. One cannot deny the fact that wherever naxalism has been in the fore, there have been gross violations of human rights.

Has it not struck our politicians that almost all the naxal-stricken States are rich in resources but are poor in health care and other development indices? Initiatives such as the Salwa Judum show how callous politicians can be when it comes to maintaining harmony and unity within communities.

Jeevan Kuruvilla
Vellore, Tamil Nadu

THE recent attack on former Chief Minister N. Janardhana Reddy and his wife is a clear testimony to the fact that naxalite activities in Andhra Pradesh are increasing at a brisk pace. Mere use of force will not solve the problem. The grievances of people in naxalite strongholds should be addressed.

Brij Bhushan Vyas
Lucknow

Hyderabad blasts

IT is no longer RDX smuggled in from Pakistan and bombs planted by Pakistanis that are causing mayhem but indigenous explosives used by Indian nationals (“Target Hyderabad”, September 21). What adds to the growing concern and mounting disquiet of citizens is that the guilty are still out there somewhere, plotting their next attack, as the government pretends that all is fine.

By adopting a soft line on terrorism, the United Progressive Alliance government believes it is reaching out to the minorities. What it does not realise is that such warped politics of appeasement recoils on both the majority and minority communities.

Members from both communities were among the victims of the Hyderabad blasts.

A. Vani
Hyderabad

FOREIGN forces have been known to be targeting the south systematically. Hyderabad was chosen as a target for the second time in 100 days. Like Bangalore, Hyderabad is a symbol of India’s progress.

Also, it is communally sensitive. Moreover, its security network is not really the best. There is need for greater vigilance.

A. Meghana
Hyderabad

FRUSTRATED by the Hyderabadis’ maturity, which prevented a communal flare-up after the Mecca Masjid blasts, the terrorists targeted public places that reflect the unity of diverse religious communities. Yet, they failed in their goal.

Sambi Reddy Endreddy
Hyderabad

Nuclear deal

PLUTONIUM, which is a raw material for nuclear weapons, can produce 600 times more energy than natural uranium (“Sanctifying mass destruction”, September 21). Technology can be used in various ways. Denial of access to technology affects India’s ability to compete in the global market. It is not just nuclear weapons that can cause mass destruction.

Instead of looking at the huge advantages the nuclear deal with the United States provides for India’s growth, it is unfortunate that the rhetoric has been around the concept of “responsible nuclear weapon state”.

T. Ravikumar
Chennai

CORRECTION

The caption for the picture on page 108 (Special Feature: Karnataka; September 7, 2007) should read "A water treatment plant at Baje, Udipi, built under the Asian Development Bank-assisted Karnataka Urban Development and Coastal Environmental Management Project (KUDCEMP), which is executed by the Karnataka Urban Infrastructure Development and Finance Corporation" , and not as published. In the same feature, the caption on page 100 erroneously describes the picture as that of the proposed Bangalore Metro station.

ANNOUNCEMENT

Letters, whether by surface mail or e-mail, must carry the full postal address and the full name, or the name with initials.



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